The first 3d printed Scenography

The first 3d printed Scenography

  • 29 September 2017
  • /
  • Art

WASP has printed the scenery of the play “Fra Diavolo”, of the “Opera” Theater in Roma.

3d printed scenography

3d Printing at “Opera” Theatre in Rome

A 3d printed scenography for a theatre play. Perhaps it’s the first time it happens; for sure there are no similar examples in the other national theater fittings: 3d printing has been used to create masks and furniture components, never an impressive scenic stage.  It happens in Rome, for the Daniel Auber‘s “Fra Diavolo” play, directed by Giorgio Barberio Corsetti, conductor Rory McDonald, on stage at the Opera Theater on October 8, 2017, in replica until 21: WASP is proud to be a technology partner of this event.

WASP has mounted a DeltaWASP 3MT Industrial next to the entrance of the Roman Opera. The big printer will be there working until the “first” Sunday of October (8th) , and the WASP engineers will feature in  the 3D printing  of a statue representing the Fra Diavolo character (on a scale 1:1).

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When Art generates job and products further to Industry inspiration

“We are sure,” said Carlo Fuortes, “that what we experienced  for the first time how to performe a scene in  the technique of the future: 3d print. Moreover, the story of theatrical performance has always been a story of inventions and  experimentation of techniques and materials. Today 3d printing is already present in all design work but also in building elements in various productive areas. Here, for the first time, thanks to WASP’s commitment and work, it is employed to build the scenery of a lyric”.

“The challenge presented to us by the Opera Theater was a very risky-one – said  Massimo Moretti, WASP founder, during the conference – It had never happened that 3d printing was applied to such a large size project. The plastic we normally use to print has a huge cost when used to produce the 1500 Kg of the scenery. So we decided to  turn to a cheaper material, one  that, when the scenery will no longer be used, can be easily recycled, shredded and reused for a new and different work. For this job at first we rented a shed near our home, now this shed is ours and we are the only 3d printing company able to produce very large objects. This is the case of Fra Diavolo, where art is dragging the industry and opening up new creations and new job opportunities. ”

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The first 3d printed scenography

When asked to make the scene of the work, the WASP team was surprised, but as it always happens, it immediately accepted the challenge. The works started in mid-April and have ended in mid-July, with the delivery of the scenic components to the Roman Theater.

The venture started when the scenographer gave Wasp a 3d printed model of two deformed historic buildings, two large facades with windows and terraces, similar to a Dalí picture: the deformed perception of reality is a central element of the work, which necessarily reflects also in its scenographic structure. The director, supported by Rome’s Superintendent, Carlo Fuortes, who is deeply confident in using 3d printing for studio and stage design, has chosen the 3d printing as the best possible solutions to achieve the desired result.

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The 3d model was a unit block, and it had to be subdivided into 223 pieces that could fit into the DeltaWASP 3MT print size, which is a 1 meter x 1 meter cylinder. The material used is PLA colored of white pigment. To tackle the work, the WASP team has used 5 printers, working at full speed during the last three months in the new warehouse where this out of the ordinary project, has been planned and realised.

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The biggest challenge was not to overtake the deadline. Thanks to a good work planning and to the speed of the WASP machines, the result came without any special problems at the set deadline: in mid-July the warehouse-floor was completely filled with pieces of the scenography, ready to be sent to Rome.

In the capital, within the spaces of the Opera House, the components were assembled and fixed on a wooden carrying structure. A few small inaccuracies did not compromise the outcome, on the contrary they emphasized the craftsmanship and the special character of the work, and the director welcomed the final result with great satisfaction. It was a test, an experiment, and a successful achievement that could pave the way for new future collaboration between theatre and 3d printing industry.

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